The local foam installer that I used here in Hilton Head told me he looked for some peeling back of the foam. This was ensuring that it was at the perfect temperature which helped them maximize their yield (profit). I have open cell foam and it pulled away a little, and did so immediately (within minutes). They went back after they were done to any spots that pulled away too much and filled them with the touch up kit; they were looking for the top edge to roll just a little bit.  https://youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o

The guys who sprayed my attic were trained and certified, but I later found out, too late, that they had no experience and my attic was the first they'd ever sprayed. I was also never told to vacate my house for any length of time, and so I (and my pets) were in the house the day they sprayed and the entire time the off ratio foam was filling my home with horrendous vapors. The company kept telling me that it was a good job and I had nothing to worry about, even after I'd had 2 other experienced sprayers from 2 different companies visually examine the foam and confirm that large areas appeared to be off ratio. The 3rd sprayer from yet another company, was also outraged because the company who did my attic had failed to vacuum up all of the old cellulose insulation, and he also noticed areas where the foam was shrinking or pulling away, and this was not even 5 weeks after the spraying.  

How Much Is Spray Foam Insulation Cost


Solvent-based polyurethane coatings have excellent adhesion and when used as a base coat over asphalt, EPDM, TPO or PVC, it eliminates the need for a primer. The resulting savings on labor and material more than offsets the higher cost of the product. When top coated with silicone, it gives you the best of both worlds. It's also an excellent gutter and RV coating.
My other question was gonna be this. We ripped all the drywall out after Hurricane Harvey and we found some latent termite damage from some time back. One of the common studs in one corner is pretty well eaten to shreds. I was gonna brace it but then I read about more modern framing practices and I read how each stud is a thermal bridge. So now I'm thinking that I won't bother with it because the house hasn't fallen down and the foam might help a little. Unless you say to brace the stud. Then I'll do it, Martin! :)

How Much For Spray Foam Insulation


When choosing a waterproofing and sealing product, we must see to it that we can easily use and apply it using simple tools, including a squeegee or a paint roller. With ease of application, we can be certain that we can achieve hassle-free application and smoother and more attractive finish than other products could give. So when reviewing the products we have featured above, we have made sure that they are easy to apply.
Spray foam insulation works by sealing the building envelope to stop conditioned air from escaping and prevent unwanted outside air from entering your home. It allows efficient use of your HVAC system and helps regulate the temperature fluctuations and humidity in your home. It's a lightweight, durable, and versatile insulation solution boasting the industry’s strongest performance in energy efficiency and energy cost savings.
Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=share
Today’s “third generation” of blowing agents have a GWP of 700 to 1000 which is still remarkably high considering water/CO2 has a GWP of 1. However, innovation from some chemical manufacturers like the Chemours Company have introduced the next generation of HFO blowing agents such as Opteon 1100, which significantly reduces the GWP impact when using closed-cell spray foam insulation products. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
I am an Architect in Toronto. I am designing a new roof addition to a row house building. Because of existing conditions and the shape of the new roof. It may be easiest to use closed cell spray foam within the areas of the joists. My question is when spray foam is used in this situation do I need to worry about how the joist members may be thermal bridges? It is not common to provide a little bit of rigid insulation to protect the joist members? The additional layer of outboard insulation will require an extra layer of plywood above the insulation which will add to cost.

I am on my third project with foam it green. I like the simplicity of it, the color blending to make it green, it alerts you quickly if something is wrong with the blending so you don't waste alot of valuable material. Follow the instructions closely, put in the prep time and you will have no issues. It seems most people's negative comments have to do with not following instructions or guidelines. It is about as close to point and shoot as you can get but there are still some essential details that need attention. The only complaint I have is the fragility of the gun, last project I cracked one on accident but luckily needed two kits to finish the project so I had a back up, but I was more careful to gently lay the gun down between applications.
I have used the Froth-Pak 200 to air-seal rim joists--the area above the foundation wall in a basement. The first time I used it I did not shake the canisters well enough and the foam did not cure properly. Don't just shake the box for a few seconds. I take the tanks out of the box so I can shake/invert each tank for a minute or two. You will be able to hear the chemical sloshing around in the tanks. Also, don't ignore the recommended temperature for application--around 75 degrees F.

I've seen this only once, and it was with closed cell foam, but I've heard of it happening with open cell foam, too. I don't know the details, but I've heard it could result from a bad batch of chemicals, improper mixing, or too high a temperature. Whatever the cause, it's not a good thing. The photo below shows how the spray foam pulled away from the studs. A little bit of uninsulated area like that adds up to a lot of heat loss/gain when the whole house has that problem, as it did here.

How Much To Spray Foam Basement

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