I have used the Froth-Pak 200 to air-seal rim joists--the area above the foundation wall in a basement. The first time I used it I did not shake the canisters well enough and the foam did not cure properly. Don't just shake the box for a few seconds. I take the tanks out of the box so I can shake/invert each tank for a minute or two. You will be able to hear the chemical sloshing around in the tanks. Also, don't ignore the recommended temperature for application--around 75 degrees F. http://y2u.be/ggLAUsiuI_o
The average price to cover 200 square feet with a foam insulation kit will run between $300 and $600 (about two to three kits). Inside these kits is something called Icynene, a foam made from two liquids that are heated and pushed through a gun on the can. When Icynene is released, it expands up to 100 times its size as it hits the surface area you're covering. These can contain a lot of gasses, making its installation a dangerous process. Even low-pressure sprayers can be harmful to homeowners' health. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
One of the high-tech insulation products being utilized these days is a foam-spray product called "Icynene," which is a foam that starts as two liquid components (a and b, if you will) that are heated up and sent through two hoses and meet at a tip of a gun where the magic begins. This is a thin film that expands to 100 times its volume in eight seconds, when it's permanently set up.

Spray Foam Exterior Walls


I am on my third project with foam it green. I like the simplicity of it, the color blending to make it green, it alerts you quickly if something is wrong with the blending so you don't waste alot of valuable material. Follow the instructions closely, put in the prep time and you will have no issues. It seems most people's negative comments have to do with not following instructions or guidelines. It is about as close to point and shoot as you can get but there are still some essential details that need attention. The only complaint I have is the fragility of the gun, last project I cracked one on accident but luckily needed two kits to finish the project so I had a back up, but I was more careful to gently lay the gun down between applications.
Spray foam is available in two different types: open-cell spray foam which is usually $0.44 to $0.65 per board foot and closed-cell spray foam which is about $1 to $1.50 per board foot. The average cost to have spray foam professionally installed is about $2,314. This number can vary depending on whether the home being insulated is newly constructed. However, finished homes are not a good candidate for spray foam insulation but great for weatherization or an energy audit.  
As this example illustrates, it's important to seal the envelope completely. One of spray foam's biggest selling points is its air-sealing ability, but it can't seal places where it's not sprayed. One of the nice things about using spray foam in new construction is that you can do a Blower Door test before the drywall goes in. Even better, you can test for leaks with a fog machine.
These coatings are emulsified asphalt and consist of asphalt particles dispersed in water; they utilize clay as the emulsifying component. These coatings also contain many types of organic and/or inorganic fibers and fillers to provide extra strength to the coating. These coatings are available in black, brown, or as a reflective coating when titanium dioxide or aluminum pigments are added. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&hc_location=ufi
Acrylic coatings are typically applied in two coats, with the second running perpendicular to the first. 1 gallon per 100 square feet is a good estimate for these coatings, as they do not need to be applied nearly as thick as many other coatings. These coatings can be sprayed or roll-applied. Acrylic coatings generally require a re-coat within 2-3 years of application.

We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...
The drawback to spray foam insulation is it's been known to cause certain health issues such irritation of the eye and the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Direct contact can cause inflammation to the skin, and some individuals have been known to break out in a rash on the arms, chest and neck area. Spray foam insulation has also been linked to a few cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This condition can cause:
A: It can be applied in the similar manner that we apply paint. We can use a paint roller to apply it without any hassle and use of special tools. You can also check the specific manual of instructions from the maker for particular directions. You should also check if it requires single or double coating or the use of a primer before its application.
DID YOU KNOW? Spray FOam insulation out-performs conventional insulation materials because they (conventional insulation materials) trap still-dry air and if that air moves or becomes wet, the thermal resistance can drop by 50%. Spray Foam protects against air infiltration, which can increase energy costs in buildings by 10 to 40%. Eliminate these drafts and live in a more energy-efficient, comfortable and healthier building by choosing spray foam insulation. http://m.youtube.com/embed/ggLAUsiuI_o
Warning: EnergyGuard™ Elastomeric Roof Coatings can freeze below 32° F. This is because the product is water based. In case of freezing temperatures, stop the application process. After application, you must allow the product time to dry before exposing the elastomeric roof coating to foot traffic or water. You should also cover the containers and dispose them responsibly after application. In case you or someone else i.e. a child ingests the coating seek immediate medical attention. Don't induce vomiting.
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A well-insulated and sealed building envelope can significantly contribute to optimal energy efficiency. As with any project, to fully utilize the benefits of spray foam, attention to detail and proper installation is crucial. It’s important to take appropriate time or seek aid through outside expertise to understand how all types of insulation products can work together within the construction of a home or building and the surrounding environment. When installed correctly, spray foam has the potential to be one of the most effective choices for insulation solutions.
I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior).

Polyurethane is a closed-cell foam insulation material that initially contains a low-conductivity gas in its cells.[5] As a result of the high thermal resistance of the gas, spray polyurethane insulation typically has an initial R-value around R-3.4 to R-6.7 per inch.[5] In comparison, blown fiberglass typically has an R-Value of only R-3 to R-4 per inch.[6]

While the R value will vary, most ocSPF products have an R value of around 3.8 per inch. Unlike medium-density closed-cell SPF, ocSPF is not a vapour barrier. When installed at 5.5 inches or more, ocSPF does act as an air barrier. It is often used for interior walls because it provides sound reduction by blocking and absorbing air leakage. It is usually only recommended for indoor applications.
Sean, thanks for jumping in and answering John's questions. About choosing the right foam, I intentionally avoided the open cell vs. closed cell foam debate. I did this partly because it's worthy of an article all by itself, but mainly I didn't include it because, despite all the warnings the two sides issue about the other, I've never personally seen a problem caused by using open cell where they should've used closed cell or vice versa. I'm sure things like that happen; I just haven't seen it yet.
As mentioned above, These coatings can work with almost any roof type. Another advantage is they are long-lasting. The coatings are resistant to fungi and mildew among other common materials that damage roofs with time. Another advantage of the coatings is that they are seamless, providing a neat uniform coating. Elastomeric coatings offer individual benefits to certain roof types. For instance, polyurethane foam roofing benefits greatly from the coatings by getting great ozone and UV light protection. The heat reflexive properties also offer great benefits such as lowering cooling costs. This advantage is enjoyed regardless of the rooftype. The heat reflexive properties also offer anti-aging properties when coatings reflect harsh sun rays which age roofs with time. Elastomeric roof coatings are also simple to use, VOC compliant and nontoxic.

How Much Is Spray Foam Per Sq Ft


Most closed-cell spray foam is now formed using hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents that have high global warming potential, partially or completely offsetting the climate benefits of the energy savings they can offer. In the United States, HFCs are scheduled to be phased out by January, 2021. A few spray foam suppliers have started supplying spray foam blown with hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blowing agents without this problem as of early 2017.[14]
If your foam pulled away just a little bit, Jamie, and they were able to fix it with just a little bit of touching up, then it wasn't as bad as the house where I saw this problem. As the last photo above shows, it had pulled away significantly from the studs and rafters, and it was all over the house. This was closed cell foam, and interestingly, it didn't pull away from the horizontal framing members, just the vertical and sloped ones. They did some touch up, but that wasn't enough. I don't know how this one ended up getting resolved. I think maybe the contractor came back and sprayed cellulose on top of the foam.

Roof Coating Denver Colorado

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