When choosing a waterproofing and sealing product, we must see to it that we can easily use and apply it using simple tools, including a squeegee or a paint roller. With ease of application, we can be certain that we can achieve hassle-free application and smoother and more attractive finish than other products could give. So when reviewing the products we have featured above, we have made sure that they are easy to apply.
Here's a simpler, less expensive alternative: Cut some 2-inch-thick rigid-foam insulation and glue it to the subfloor between the joists or support it with nails driven partway into the joists. Then fill any gaps between the edges of the foam boards and the joists using the canned spray foam sold at home centers or hardware stores. An even easier option is to nail the foam panels against the bottom edge of the joists and seal the joints with canned foam, but you'll lose some headroom and access to any pipes and wires between the joists. As with spray-foam kits, protect yourself and the floor from the dripping globs of canned foam. A full face shield, gloves, and a hat would be a good start.

If you’re not familiar, spray foam is a type of insulation that expands after you spray. The foam expands and seals, avoiding any type of unnecessary moisture (which can create mold) or encouraging pests to eat through your walls. It protects the lining of your house, and even can protect the heating and cooling of your house during those unbearably cold or hot days. https://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o

c) Make sure that the over expanded access is properly removed from the walls. We had a junior cutter taking too much off by bending his saw into the cavity. Look closely at the inside wall corners, and ceiling/wall corners to make sure that the foam is properly removed flush with the studs. If it has not been cut back flush it may lead to uneven drywall finishes .


Also, I'm wondering... Is this website is being regularly updated? A local installer (in Oct, 2010) in MA quoted over twice the price you list here. "Open cell alone ~$1.35 per sq ft for R-13. Or a 'hybrid method' using 2inch closed cell for R-13 followed by 1.5inch open cell for R-6. Hybrid is $2.85 per sq foot for R-19 rating". Maybe installers are charging higher prices to profit from those trying to meet government energy rebate by Dec 31?

Spray Foam


In the early days of insulating attics, people believed the insulation was a heat source. That’s not the case, as the insulation is actually a barrier between two areas of different temperatures. As for the “hot roof” theory, the unvented attic system could make the temperature of the roof go up a little, but this increase won’t cause damage to your shingles.

Spray Foam Under Mobile Home


The local foam installer that I used here in Hilton Head told me he looked for some peeling back of the foam. This was ensuring that it was at the perfect temperature which helped them maximize their yield (profit). I have open cell foam and it pulled away a little, and did so immediately (within minutes). They went back after they were done to any spots that pulled away too much and filled them with the touch up kit; they were looking for the top edge to roll just a little bit.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Spray polyurethane foam, or SPF, is the main type of 2-part, closed-cell spray foam used by insulation contractors. Large-scale insulation jobs require special equipment as well as safety gear to protect the installer from chemical fumes during installation. When the foam cures and hardens just several minutes after application, it's completely safe for as long as it stays in place.

I don't even want to ask this question but... several years ago we hired a local contractor to spray high density foam on the roof deck and walls of our unfinished 2nd floor. We realized that the job was done poorly and cut an access into the attic space to assess things. We realize now that they spray foamed directly to the chimney (no flashing). The chimney is currently used for a woodstove and DHW venting. The DHW will go away but wood stove will remain. My question is, how bad (unsafe) is this? I have found information on foam exposure to fire but have not been able to find anything about temperature ratings in general (i.e. what happens on prolonged exposure to high temperatures).

Spray Foam Roofing


Fill and seal expanding foam sealant is urethane Fill and seal expanding foam sealant is urethane foam designed to fill large areas quickly and permanently. Uses include filling holes cracks or gaps that require a complete airtight and waterproof seal but are too large to be filled with ordinary caulk. The foam expands approximately 3 times its original ...  More + Product Details Close

NovaTuff PC-425 An Epoxy Protection Coating, similar to NovaTuff PC-450 but with enhanced flexibility and adhesion. Waterproofing grade. Formulated for continuous underwater submersion and for waterproofing pools, ponds, fountains, tanks, waterfalls etc. Mini-fiber additive aides in bonding/adhesion to difficult surfaces. Excellent chemical and abrasion resistance. Resistant to acids, solvents, caustics, hydrocarbons, salt water, etc. Use submerged or above grade.
Spray foam insulation, like other insulation, saves on energy costs and lowers utility bills. Studies by the US Department of Energy show that 40% of a home's energy is lost as the result of air infiltration through walls, windows and doorways. Buildings treated with spray foam insulation insulate as much as 50% better than traditional insulation products.
The guys who sprayed my attic were trained and certified, but I later found out, too late, that they had no experience and my attic was the first they'd ever sprayed. I was also never told to vacate my house for any length of time, and so I (and my pets) were in the house the day they sprayed and the entire time the off ratio foam was filling my home with horrendous vapors. The company kept telling me that it was a good job and I had nothing to worry about, even after I'd had 2 other experienced sprayers from 2 different companies visually examine the foam and confirm that large areas appeared to be off ratio. The 3rd sprayer from yet another company, was also outraged because the company who did my attic had failed to vacuum up all of the old cellulose insulation, and he also noticed areas where the foam was shrinking or pulling away, and this was not even 5 weeks after the spraying.  
Spray foam insulation is a great product. Homes insulated with it can be some of the most efficient and comfortable homes built. I've been in plenty of these homes and can tell you that when spray foam is installed properly, they outperform 99% of fiberglass batt-insulated, stick-built homes. (I can also tell you that 73% of all statistics are made up on the spot, so please don't ask for documentation of that statistic.)
The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.) 

Thank you, Allison. We have a split system unit (actually 5) with the heat being propane. The foam guy said that it needed ventilation, so completely sealing the attic wouldn't be a good idea. It sounds like you are saying that the systems need to be vented out of the attic or replaced with some type of closed system. But I shouldn't bother spraying if the plan is to leave the soffet vents open. Is that correct?
Current guidelines recommend up to 10 inches of insulation in your attic . This is usually added to the ground, rather than the roof line, which results in the loss of your storage area, due to not being able to refit floor boards after installation. By implementing spray foam insulation to the roof line, you regain the lost 10 inches, thus increasing storage, height and practicality.

Warning: EnergyGuard™ Elastomeric Roof Coatings can freeze below 32° F. This is because the product is water based. In case of freezing temperatures, stop the application process. After application, you must allow the product time to dry before exposing the elastomeric roof coating to foot traffic or water. You should also cover the containers and dispose them responsibly after application. In case you or someone else i.e. a child ingests the coating seek immediate medical attention. Don't induce vomiting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=ggLAUsiuI_o


I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 


Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling. 

How Much Does Spray Foam Insulation Cost

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