According to the Department of Energy, an estimated 20 to 40 percent of a home’s utility bill could be going to waste from drafts and air leaks around openings. As temperatures cool and energy costs rise, the positive impact of energy efficiency on a building comes into focus. Air can enter and escape a structure through every gap, compromising the building envelope. Adding the right insulation and air-sealing will close these gaps, keeping interior spaces comfortable and reducing energy bills. 
Roof coatings can add 25 years to the service life of a roof and reduce the amount of discarded roofing materials that end up in landfills. The infrared image on the right shows 175 °F (79 °C) on the uncoated (black) section of the modified bitumen roof. The coated (white) section is 79 °F (26 °C). Field studies have shown that cool roof coatings can lower rooftop temperatures and reduce air conditioning bills.
Polyurethane is a closed-cell foam insulation material that initially contains a low-conductivity gas in its cells.[5] As a result of the high thermal resistance of the gas, spray polyurethane insulation typically has an initial R-value around R-3.4 to R-6.7 per inch.[5] In comparison, blown fiberglass typically has an R-Value of only R-3 to R-4 per inch.[6]

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Although spray foam insulation has been in use since the 1940s, primarily for aircraft, for the past 30 years, continual product innovation has seen the increased adoption of spray foam insulation in residential and commercial construction. The rapid growth of sprayed foam insulation in building construction, thanks in part to its immediate and long-term benefits, has allowed the insulation material to sit confidently alongside traditional insulation types in providing thermal comfort for building occupants. https://m.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o
We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...
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Note:  A board foot is defined as a 12" x 12" square at 1" thick. Actual output can be affected by a number of factors including temperature and humidity. The theoretical yield has become an industry standard for identifying certain sizes of two component kits. Theoretical yield calculations are performed in perfect laboratory conditions, without taking into account the loss of blowing agent or the variations in application methods and types.

It also has a great waterproofing ability that can shield the roof’s membrane from water and moisture damage. You can also count on the liquid roof coating for its outstanding performance for a wide range of applications and uses. This product can be used at tears and seams as well as in sealing air conditioners and venting systems and anywhere else where rubberized coating is needed.


I've seen this only once, and it was with closed cell foam, but I've heard of it happening with open cell foam, too. I don't know the details, but I've heard it could result from a bad batch of chemicals, improper mixing, or too high a temperature. Whatever the cause, it's not a good thing. The photo below shows how the spray foam pulled away from the studs. A little bit of uninsulated area like that adds up to a lot of heat loss/gain when the whole house has that problem, as it did here.

How Much To Spray Foam Basement


FROTH-PAK Foam Sealant is a two-component quick-cure polyurethane FROTH-PAK Foam Sealant is a two-component quick-cure polyurethane foam that fills cavities penetrations cracks and expansion joints. FROTH-PAK foam sealant can also be used as a sealant and void fill in many roofing applications. FROTH-PAK is chemically cured foam which significantly reduces curing time. FROTH-PAK dispenses expands and becomes tack ...  More + Product Details Close https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o


If you don't have the patience to slowly fill the void with spray foam through holes drilled in one of the studs, you could (if you were an experienced carpenter) use a Sawzall to remove one of the studs and re-frame the corner as a two-stud corner. Then you could either insulate the void with a fiberglass batt or simply present the two-stud corner to the spray-foam contractor as an accessible corner.

Here's a simpler, less expensive alternative: Cut some 2-inch-thick rigid-foam insulation and glue it to the subfloor between the joists or support it with nails driven partway into the joists. Then fill any gaps between the edges of the foam boards and the joists using the canned spray foam sold at home centers or hardware stores. An even easier option is to nail the foam panels against the bottom edge of the joists and seal the joints with canned foam, but you'll lose some headroom and access to any pipes and wires between the joists. As with spray-foam kits, protect yourself and the floor from the dripping globs of canned foam. A full face shield, gloves, and a hat would be a good start.
During colder months, 2 component foam is very sensitive to temperature variances. Per product instructions, both tank temperatures need to be above 70°F (21°C) for at least 24 hours prior to use. All application surfaces should be clean/dry and above 60°F (16°C) prior to application. Variance outside of the recommended temperature can affect foam yield and performance.
Silicone based coatings can be spray or roller-applied, and should utilize a medium-nap roller when rolled. These coatings are applied anywhere from 2 to 3.5 gallons per 100 square feet, depending on the substrate. Silicone has two major advantages over the other four types of coatings that should be considered when searching for the best roof coating: 1) it can resist ponding water for extended periods of time and 2) it can adhere to most substrates without a primer. Because of these two major advantages, silicone is the best roof coating that satisfies both quality and cost-effectiveness.
Demilec, a company located in Texas, has invented a type of insulation foam that can help all of the cracks and uneven pavement problems. Geolift can help to lift existing concrete surfaces and fix those problem areas around your house with much less labor. Geolift works for driveways, sidewalks, patios, garage floors, even pool decks. And yes, it is a foam, just like your beloved spray foam!
The roof must be thoroughly cleaned, and allowed to dry thoroughly. This is a critical step to ensure a successful coating application. Be careful not to damage the lap seams. Care should be taken when pressure washing not to disturb the integrity of the underlying roof membrane particularly where there are adhered seams. Refer to the specific coating manufacturer you are using for their specific requirements for roof preparation. http://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Also, I'm wondering... Is this website is being regularly updated? A local installer (in Oct, 2010) in MA quoted over twice the price you list here. "Open cell alone ~$1.35 per sq ft for R-13. Or a 'hybrid method' using 2inch closed cell for R-13 followed by 1.5inch open cell for R-6. Hybrid is $2.85 per sq foot for R-19 rating". Maybe installers are charging higher prices to profit from those trying to meet government energy rebate by Dec 31?

Spray Foam


Closed-cell foam has a higher density and offers a higher R-value per inch. It also adds strength to walls, ceilings and roofs and can contribute to a structure’s overall durability. Additionally, closed-cell foam’s low water vapor permeability offers protection from moisture when installed in places where high humidity—from climate, occupants, or flooding—meets the structure. 
These coatings are emulsified asphalt and consist of asphalt particles dispersed in water; they utilize clay as the emulsifying component. These coatings also contain many types of organic and/or inorganic fibers and fillers to provide extra strength to the coating. These coatings are available in black, brown, or as a reflective coating when titanium dioxide or aluminum pigments are added.
A: It can be applied in the similar manner that we apply paint. We can use a paint roller to apply it without any hassle and use of special tools. You can also check the specific manual of instructions from the maker for particular directions. You should also check if it requires single or double coating or the use of a primer before its application.
I live in Baton Rouge LA with a very old and drafty house. There is no blockages in the walls between the crawl space and attic. Lots of critters just come on in. I would like to used closed cell sprayed under house to warm up floors and block moisture. I would like to spray closed cell into attic, but am afraid of enclosing attic due to moisture build-up. Can I spray closed cell against the attic floor in same way as installing bats, thus leaving my venting the same as it always has been. Other ideas? Thanks.

How Much Is Spray Foam Roofing

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